Apple & disruptive innovation: 4 questions innovators need to ask before moving forward!

Arthur Weiss Competitive Intelligence Leave a Comment

Steve Jobs thought that most people live in a small box. “They think they can’t influence or change things a lot.” Jobs urged his staff to reject that philosophy as untrue. Disruptive innovation is seen by many companies as a threat to them – but not by Apple who are happy to embrace disruptive technologies. An interview with Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO, in FastCompany magazine shows that things are not as simple – and this offers lessons for all companies looking at new technology. The key points are that Apple doesn’t go for every new technology. First they need to understand and have faith in the primary technology behind an innovation. They then consider two questions: What can Apple add to this – and will it be embraced by society or be seen as something positive. These are interesting questions as a new technology will only be disruptive when people …

Google versus Bing – a competitive intelligence case study

Arthur Weiss Case Studies, Competitive Intelligence, Ethics, Online & Search Issues Leave a Comment

Google catches Bing red-handed via a counter-competitive intelligence sting operation showing how Bing uses some of Google’s results and uses them in their own result pages as part of the Bing Algorithm.

Leave your comfort zone!

Arthur Weiss Management / Marketing / CI Theory, Marketing Principles Leave a Comment

The Ansoff Matrix helps companies to make marketing decisions on whether to develop their products, markets or to diversify. The process is similar to the commands given by God to Abraham in Genesis 12 where he is told to leave his country, family and home. Each has an element of risk – and only through accepting and taking such risks can success be guaranteed.

The importance of lateral thinking!

Arthur Weiss Case Studies, Leadership & Management, Marketing Principles Leave a Comment

A story is told about a supermarket that was having problems with gangs meeting in its car park after the supermarket had shut for the night – trading drugs, fighting and generally making a mess and nuisance. The supermarket tried various conventional solutions to solve the problem: fences, increased security, and the like. Nothing worked long-term and, moreover, they were all expensive. Then somebody thought that perhaps a different approach might work. The gangs were all trying to look cool, and the supermarket car-park had gained a reputation as a cool place to hang out at night. So what did the supermarket do? They thought about what could make the car park an uncool place to be, and started up a loud-speaker system piping the music of Mantovani over the parking spaces. Quickly the problem disappeared – as what kind of “cool” 16-18 year old wants to be associated with …